Newcastle Brown Ale

Newcastle Brown Ale

Tonight I ran some errands. All of them had to do with getting ready for the Beer Meetup this coming Saturday. Picked up some delicious door prizes that I’m sure people will like. Unfortunately the weather looks like a shit-show on Saturday. Seriously, haven’t we had enough of this wintery crap??? I may have to postpone the event two weeks. I’m not pulling the trigger yet though, so the event is officially still on for Saturday.

Newcastle Brown Ale

After running errands we hit up a local Mexican joint for fajitas and booze. I ordered a Dos Equis. The waitress asked which one I wanted (light or dark). WTF do I know? I always ask for a Dos Equis and I always get the same thing…now I have choices? So, I said “Give me the regular one”. And of course I get Dos Equis Lager. Note: When you’re in the mood for a Dos Equis Amber, the lager tastes like ass. OK, that’s an over exaggeration; it wasn’t that bad actually.

Newcastle Brown Ale

Now I’m home and watching the Bruins in an EPIC game against the Dallas Stars. Go Bs!!! While I watch I need a beer. I have some of this Newcastle sitting around which will do just fine.

I know some people who have Newcastle as their go-to beer. I frankly have never been a huge fan of the stuff.

The primary flavor I get is that nutty flavor you get with many browns. It gets some bitterness from (presumably) some roasted malts. It’s not particularly sweet, nor particularly bitter. Medium carbonation. Goes down real quick but doesn’t give up ground in the flavor department.

It gets a rousing “Meh” from me. I’d be curious to hear from someone who really likes the beer…what draws you to the beer? Are you a giant fan of brown ales in general? I have a hunch my “meh” is related to the fact that browns are one of my least favorite styles.

-Lost

Newcastle Brown Ale

Author: Joshua Dion

I write about beer in an un-intimidating way, welcoming beer lovers of all experience levels.

18 thoughts on “Newcastle Brown Ale”

  1. It’s been a while since I’ve had one, but I noticed not too long ago that you can get a mini-keg that’s compatible with the Krups Beertender. That right there’s enough reason to drink more. (Especially if you’re not that fond of Heineken.)

    1. Matt:

      Yeah, I’ve seen the mini keg. I wonder if it tastes better than Newcastle out of a bottle. The bottles are clear and thus let light damage the beer.

      -Lost

  2. I’ve been a fan for a while. They are smooth, and slide, they are all the things you said, not bitter, not sweet, not too much of anything. Yeah, it can be character less, but they hit a certain spot for me. My next home brew will be a maple brown ale.
    AO

    1. AO:

      That’s kinda the answer I expected. It’s a chugging beer for people who like brown ales. I have no problem with that; I have my own inexpensive chugging beer.

      Thanks for the insight!

      -Lost

  3. It is now a mass-produced beer brewed by a multi-national company. Thousands of gallons of ‘bright beer’ made then flavouring, colouring and lots of other chemicals added. Stick to craft.

  4. Hey Lost.

    Before I started my blog, this was a beer I had fairly regularly. That was until I discovered how many other options there are, beers that are so much better. I did have the chance to drink this beer a few months ago, though. The PR firm for Newcastle sent me a few bottles to review. I drank one, it was ok but mostly meh as you said. The other bottle I brought to my office to pawn off on my coworkers. I just looked in the refrigerator, and after months, no one has claimed it yet. LOL.

  5. I’ll go on record as saying I enjoy a Newcastle every now and then. Is it the best brown ale? No. Is it the worst? Far from it. It’s a decent, easy drinking, brown ale with nothing overly special about it. I don’t know that I’d call it “meh” (I’d probably call your favored ‘Gansett “meh” over this one), but it’s definitely average, maybe slightly below.

    I like brown ales. They’re good easy drinking beers for when you want a darker beer, but not something as heavy as a stout or even a porter.

    I’m also going to go on record and refute the “other chemicals” added. I want to know what chemicals are added to beer by any brewery, A-B included. Sure, they use adjuncts like corn or rice to boost the alcohol and lighten the flavor, but they don’t use chemicals.

  6. I agree with the others – Newcastle Brown is “Meh”. I imagine you learned your lesson about Dos Equis – the light is mega-meh, while the amber is only semi-meh. Dos Equis Amber is often the best best beer choice in standard Tex-Mex joints.

    1. Modelo or Negro Modelo are probably the best beers I’ve seen in Mexican restaurants (at least those that don’t have Sam Adams). I enjoy Negro Modelo with Mexican food.

  7. Newcastle can be likened to White Zinfandel for the wine drinker. It seems to be a good introductory beer into the darker beers. People who are used to drinking light beers may able to drink Newcastle. As for being one of those “light beer” drinkers I can attest to the fact that Newcastle was one of the beers that I first drank to get myself to open my horizons, much like White Zin was for my wife, who now drinks complicated red wines on the regular. Newcastle isn’t bad to go back to once in a while, especially if you are interested in chugging something a little heavier than a coors light. An amazing beer, it is not, but it will do in a pinch.

  8. After a long time away from New Castle I was inspired by a friend to give it another try because it is his “go-to” beer as said before. After a couple of swigs it made me check the expiration date. Even with an open heart, I sincerely regretted my purchase (easily $1.50 more than my favorite craft brews). All of it’s elements were just mediocre, no significant taste or unique attributes. It barely scraped by on my charts as a brown ale, comparable in my opinion to a yuengling :(… Personal recommendation, Southern Pecan by Magnolia, or Sweet Water’s Geogia Brown Ale.

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